Thursday, June 16, 2022
HomeHealthIs Coffee Good For Migraine

Is Coffee Good For Migraine

Broccoli May Help Prevent Menstrual Migraine

Changes in hormone levels can lead to headaches, especially for women with menstrual migraine or headaches, says Brown. Falling levels of estrogen, which occur just before menstruation begins, can trigger an attack, according to the Migraine Research Foundation.

Women who have this type of migraine would benefit from increasing their intake of cruciferous vegetables, because of their effects on estrogen, Brown says.

Cruciferous vegetables contain hormonally active compounds called phytoestrogens, which can have estrogenic, or estrogen-like, effects in humans or, conversely, antiestrogenic effects. Its thought that the antiestrogenic effects of some phytoestrogens may lower a womans risk of certain types of cancer by lowering her exposure to her own estrogen.

Some research, , indicates phytoestrogens improve bone mineral density and markers of cardiovascular risk in post-menopausal women effects that estrogen would be expected to have in premenopausal women.

Theres also some evidence that phytoestrogens help to prevent menstrual migraine attacks in premenopausal women, according to a review published in Neurological Sciences.

Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bok choy those can all be very helpful if you include more of them in your diet, says Brown.

Secret Reasons Women Shouldnt Drink Coffee

Plus I share my thoughts on the Bulletproof/Upgraded Coffee trend, How Women Need toBiohack their Energy Levels Differently than Men,  and How to Heal from Caffeine Exposure

In my early 20s during a routine GYN visit my doctor found a lump in my breast.  She asked two other doctors to come in to examine it and the three of them were talking about it as if I wasnt even there. My anxiety about potentially having something serious was mounting.

I remember being totally terrified, actually. Eventually, after what seemed like hours, they decided that it was a fluid filled cyst, so of course I asked what might have caused that.  My GYN then asked me if I had been drinking lots of caffeine recently the answer was a huge yes – I had been staying up late studying for finals and then it came out that caffeine increases the tendency of breast tissue to produce cysts.

I stopped taking in all forms of caffeine that day, and have been caffeine free for 20 years.  The research that has come out since I made that choice has only made me more grateful that I listened to that early warning signal from my body.  I wanted to share with you 3 little-known reasons you, as a woman, shouldnt be drinking coffee or caffeine in general, especially if you have PMS, are trying to conceive, or have a diagnosed menstrual issue.  

Reason #1 – Caffeine Causes Cyst Formation in the Breasts and Ovaries

Reason #2 – Your Genes Determine If You Can Metabolize Caffeine Safely

Caffeine As A Headache Treatment

Caffeine seems to be an effective acute treatment for migraine, or at least a component for the acute treatment of migraine from a patient perspective, says Roderick Spears, MD, a neurologist and headache specialist at Penn Medicine in Philadelphia.

Patients often report that if they can have a caffeinated beverage combined with a medication, its usually helpful during an attack, Dr. Spears says.

There are also medications to treat headache and migraine both over-the-counter and prescription that contain caffeine and can be helpful for some patients when they are having a migraine attack, says Spears.

All formulations of the over-the-counter drug Excedrin , for example, contain 65 mg of caffeine per tablet, along with acetaminophen and aspirin.

Similarly the drug Cafergot, available by prescription, contains ergotamine and caffeine. Each tablet contains 100 mg of caffeine, and the recommended dose is to take two tablets as soon as you notice a migraine attack starting and one additional tablet every 30 minutes up to a total of six tablets per 24 hours if symptoms continue.

The mechanism of action behind caffeines pain-relieving potential is related to the blood vessels, says Spears.

We know that blood vessels dilate with migraine, and caffeine is thought to be beneficial because it causes vasoconstriction. Thats what people are addressing when they consume a caffeinated beverage or a medication that contains caffeine when they have a migraine, he says.

What Are Some Good Caffeine Alternatives To Get The Energy You Need

If drinking coffee is a migraine trigger for you, there are plenty of other ways to get the energy boost that you need.

We polled longtime migraine sufferers to find out their favorite caffeine alternatives:

Fruit and Exercise

After totally detoxing from caffeine due to a correlation with her own migraines, Jenn, 30, finds that a combination of fruit and exercisekeep her naturally energized, perhaps even more so than when she consumed coffee.

Tea, Chocolate, Soda, and Naps

Kelleigh, 32, limits her coffee consumption, but turns to tea and chocolate if she needs to kickstart her productivity at work. Catie, 30, will drink soda from time to time and is a big fan of the power napfor a much-needed energy boost.

Green Tea

When looking for caffeine alternatives, Dr. Crystal says to be mindful of the caffeine content of whatever youâre consuming or ingesting. Green tea is a great option as it contains less caffeine than coffee , while caffeine levels in energy drinks are very high.

âWhen it comes to alternatives for coffee, the caffeine content is the most important factor, but there are other things to consider,â Dr. Crystal says. âFor example, energy drinks contain other ingredients that may be harmful and should be avoided.â

Understanding Rebound Related Symptoms

The Truth on Whether Coffee Brings or Reduces Migraines

While caffeine is not directly responsible for migraines, sudden withdrawal of it can cause a rebound effect, with which most of us are familiar. The NHF recommends those with frequent headaches avoid daily use. For myself, I would avoid having multiple lattes or cups of coffee per day, but I seem to do fine with my usual intake of two 12 oz Cherry Cokes. So like everything, moderation is probably the best bet. If you have any questions about whether caffeine is hurting you, or could help you, ask your physician.

Who Would Need A Migraine Treatment

If a person has more than 4 exhausting attacks per month and each attack lasts for more than 12 hours, he/she is a perfect candidate for the migraine preventive therapy. People in need of the preventive therapy can experience a prolonged aura or weakness and pain-relieving medications fail to work for them.

Caffeine May Help Relieve Headaches

The pain you experience with headaches specifically migraines  is typically caused by the enlargement of blood vessels around your brain, which increases the amount of blood flow to your brain. This change in blood flow triggers a number of complicated mechanisms in the brain that can lead to headaches. 

Caffeine narrows these blood vessels and is known to have “vasoconstrictive” properties. This means that it constricts vessels and reduces the blood flow to your brain, and as a result, it can help relieve migraine pain. 

For example, a 2009 study published in the Human Brain Mapping Journal found that caffeine reduced cerebral blood flow that’s the blood supply to the brain by an average of 27%.   

In this way, caffeine can help stop you from developing migraines in the first place, as well as relieving pain once you already have one. 

Caffeine can also help relieve headaches by improving the effectiveness of pain relief medication. In fact, it’s a key ingredient in headache medications like Excerdine and Anacin, because it helps you absorb the active ingredients in the medication. 

For example, a 2017 review published in The Journal of Headache and Pain studied the results of seven different controlled trials on patients who suffered from migraines or tension-type headaches over a 40-year period. The researchers found that over-the-counter pain relief medication containing caffeine works faster and more effectively than pain relief medication alone. 

Healing Homemade Ginger Ale

You can make your own, healthier version of ginger ale at home to help you stay hydrated and find migraine relief. Ginger does double duty for nausea and headache relief. Home-made sodas do not have additives or sweeteners that store-bought ones do that might trigger migraines in some people. Making soda at home gives you complete control of the ingredients and the flavor.

A Few More Potential Trigger Foods

Even though weâd hate to take the fun out of even more of your favorite foods, we should let you know about these other potential trigger foods. According to the Cleveland Clinic, these foods are commonly reported as migraine triggers, but thereâs no scientific evidence that they really cause them, so donât clean out your fridge just yet. Instead, turn to a migraine tracker to see if any of these might be causing you pain.

  • Avocados
  • Chicken livers and other organ meats
  • Dairy products like buttermilk, sour cream, and yogurt
  • Dried fruits like dates, figs, and raisins
  • Garlic
  • Most beans including lima, fava, navy, pinto, garbanzo, lentils, and snow peas
  • Onions
  • Pickled foods like olives, sauerkraut, and, of course, pickles
  • Potato chips
  • Some fresh fruits like ripe bananas, papaya, red plums, raspberries, kiwi, and pineapple
  • Smoked or dried fish
  • Tomato-based products

Dr William B Young Advises:

That’s a question with a complicated answer. The key to whether caffeine is harmful or beneficial depends on how much you ingest.

We know that caffeine can help migraines. Some people find that a cup of coffee or tea helps relieve an occasional or . Caffeine is also used as an ingredient in many commonly used prescription and over-the-counter headache medications.

However, caffeine can also cause headaches. An important study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine about ten years ago, found that people who drank more than one cup of coffee a day were at risk for getting a withdrawal headache if they went without it. This is why people who drink coffee at work on weekdays may develop headaches on the weekends

Also, people who get occasional headaches or migraines and drink more than two cups per day of caffeinated beverages -or who take a lot of medication that contains caffeine – are at risk for developing daily headaches. If you fall into this group, you should gradually cut down on your caffeine intake until it is eliminated. Then you usually will go back to getting only occasional headaches. But you must cut down on the caffeine very gradually or your headaches may worsen.

Where Is A Caffeine Withdrawal Headache Located

A caffeine withdrawal headache can present as a feeling of pain and pressure that pushes outwards from the brain. Starting behind the eyes, it can move up to the front of the head. Caffeine withdrawal headaches can also present with migraine-like symptoms and as a widespread feeling of throbbing pain.

Herbal Teas Have Multiple Headache Benefits

Tea can help with overall hydration, which in itself can prevent or relieve a headache, and depending on the type of tea, there are other benefits as well, according to Brown.

Peppermint can be effective in relieving sinus pressure, says Brown. Sinus congestion and pressure are common symptoms of a sinus headache, brought on by inflammation and swelling of the sinuses, according to the American Migraine Foundation.

Peppermint oil is used as an essential oil for headache or migraine. You could put peppermint oil or fresh peppermint in a cup of hot water and inhale the steam and also drink the liquid, says Brown.

A study published in 2019 in the International Journal of Preventive Medicine found that a drop of diluted peppermint oil dripped into the nose was effective in decreasing the intensity of headaches caused by migraine in about 42 percent of participants who tried it.

There is some evidence that ginger tea can help with a tension headache, according to Brown.

Also, a study published in Phytotherapy Research found that drinking a half teaspoon of powdered ginger in warm water helped reduce migraine severity.

Migraine Headaches: Still Mysterious After All These Years

Caffeine Free Coffee Alternatives for Vestibular Migraine ...

Migraine headaches are quite common: more than a billion people reportedly suffer from migraines worldwide. Yet, the cause has long been a mystery and it still is.

Until recently, the going theory was that blood vessels around the brain go into spasm, temporarily constricting and limiting blood flow. Then, when the blood vessels open up, the rush of incoming blood flow leads to the actual headache.

That theory has fallen out of favor. Now, the thinking is that migraines are due to waves of electrical activity spreading across the outer portions of the brain, leading to inflammation and overreactive nerve cells that send inappropriate pain signals. Why this begins in the first place is unknown.

Migraines tend to run in families, so genetic factors are likely important. In addition, chemical messengers within the brain, such as serotonin, may also play a central role in the development of migraines, though the mechanisms remain uncertain.

People prone to migraines may experience more headaches after coffee consumption , but coffee itself, or the caffeine it contains, is not considered the actual cause of migraines. Certain foods or drinks like coffee are thought to trigger episodes of migraine, but the true cause is not known.

Caffeine Headache As A Withdrawal Symptom

On the flipside, if youve ever tried to cut back on caffeine, you know that headaches can occur as a result. And it doesnt matter what foods or drinks the caffeine comes from the issue is whether you have a regular habit of consuming about the same amount of caffeine every day. If you suddenly get a lot less caffeine, you’ll likely have a headache.

Caffeine withdrawal isnt just something that happens to people who drink a lot of coffee or caffeinated beverages; it can happen to people to drink as little as one small cup of coffee per day, according to StatPearls.

The incidence of headache as a result of caffeine withdrawal can be as high as 50 percent and thats in the general population, not just in people who have migraine.

How To Reduce Caffeine Dependence

The best way to reduce caffeine dependency is gradually, ideally, by cutting down on caffeine intake by around each week.

Coffee, tea, or soda drinkers may find it easier to transition to decaffeinated versions of their favorite beverages. People could also try mixing decaf with caffeinated drinks and gradually increasing the proportion of decaf to caffeinated.

Several other tricks and lifestyle habits can also help people reduce their caffeine dependence, such as:

  • replacing caffeinated foods and drinks with caffeine free alternatives
  • staying hydrated

So Can Caffeine Really Cause A Migraine

The short answer? Yes.

Let us explain: While studies have found no proof that drinking caffeine will automatically trigger a migraine, Dr. Crystal warns that the stimulant is still one to be wary of.

âCaffeine withdrawal is a known trigger for migraine and other headache types, and caffeine itself may trigger migraines,â Dr. Crystal says.

Migraine triggers are unique for everyone, but studies show that when it comes to caffeine, the amount consumed may have more weight in whether or not you develop a headache. Research from the American Journal of Medicine shows that three or more servings of caffeinated beverages a day is associated with developing a migraine in individuals who experience episodic migraines.

What About Caffeine And Other Types Of Headaches

Even those who donât suffer from migraines can experience headaches associated with caffeine intake, such as rebound headaches . Caffeine is prone to dependency, and rebound headaches occur when you consume too much caffeine, subsequently experiencing withdrawal.

For migraine sufferers, rebound headaches may prove to be more devastating, so itâs a smart idea to limit your caffeine intake and decrease your dependency on the stimulant. Decreased dependency will also help caffeine help you in the case of an oncoming migraine: Eric, 30, typically limits himself to one cup of coffee per day, but has found that if he feels an oncoming migraine, drinking a little more coffee can help.

Drinking This Much Coffee May Trigger Migraines

Three or more caffeinated drinks a day is linked with migraines.

Drinking too much coffee or other caffeinated drinks may be a trigger for migraines among people prone to these severe headaches, a new study suggests.

The study researchers found that, among people with periodic migraine headaches, consuming at least three caffeinated drinks a day was tied to a higher likelihood of experiencing a migraine on that day or the following day. However, consuming only one or two caffeinated drinks a day was generally not associated with migraines, the study found.

Although many people anecdotally report that caffeine tends to trigger their migraines, few rigorous studies have examined this link. Indeed, the new study, published today in The American Journal of Medicine, is one of the first to examine whether daily changes in caffeine intake are tied to the onset of migraines.

“Interestingly, despite some patients with episodic migraine thinking they need to avoid caffeine, we found that drinking one to two servings day was not associated with higher risk of headache,” study senior author Dr. Suzanne Bertisch, an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and a clinical investigator in the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, said in a statement. Still, more research is needed to confirm the findings; “but it is an important first step,” Bertisch said.

Does Caffeine Treat Or Trigger Headaches

Many people ask whether caffeine can treat or trigger a headache. The answer is that caffeine can do both.

Caffeine can provide relief for a headache.

During a headache, blood vessels swell, tighten or go through other changes, causing an increase in blood flow around the brain. This increase blood flow pressures surrounding nerves, which send pain messages to the brain. This brings on the headache.

Caffeine has vasoconstrictive properties, meaning that blood vessels narrow to restrict blood flow, thereby alleviating the pain. Also, when caffeine is taken in combination with pain medicines, such as aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen, it increases the absorption and strength of the medication to provide faster relief.

Caffeine can trigger a headache.

When caffeine is consumed regularly, the body becomes dependent on its effects. And because caffeine narrows the blood vessels that surround the brain, when consumption is stopped, the blood vessels enlarge. This causes an increase in blood flow around the brain and pressures surrounding nerves. This can then trigger what is known as a caffeine withdrawal headache. Withdrawal headaches can last for a couple of weeks because it takes the body a while to adjust to not having caffeine in its system.

What should you do?

Kelli Tornstrom is a nurse practitioner in Neurology in La Crosse, Wisconsin.

Topics in this Post

Next Time Your Head Begins To Throb Reach For A Glass Instead Of A Pill Bottle Try These Drinks For Headaches And Migraines For A More Delicious Way To Feel Better

All headaches are not created equal. With tension headaches, caffeine headaches, sinus headaches, hangover headaches and full-blown migraine attacks, the causes and symptoms vary from headache to headache and person to person. If you are one of the millions of people who are prone to headaches or migraines, these drinks for headaches may help stop the pain and nausea.

The symptoms of a migraine or headache can be wide-ranging and debilitating. Sensitivity to light, sound and smell; nausea, vomiting, and constipation; brain fog and head pain are all ways migraines bring you down and ruin your day. Luckily, you may not need to treat milder headaches with an expensive medication or a prescription. Often, you can find relief right in your own kitchen with these drinks for headaches.

Most migraines are severe enough that doctors will prescribe a prescription medication, such as a triptan, to abort an attack. Triptans are highly effective, but people are often reluctant to take them. If you are one of the many people who gets frequent migraines or headaches, taking a pill each time can actually make them worse. Natural alternatives, like these 11 drinks for headaches, can bring you relief and help you save money and medication.

These drinks are safe with few or no side effects, too, so you do not have to worry about feeling worse before you feel better. Staying hydrated during a headache or migraine is crucial, and these drinks all help with hydration while treating symptoms.

Is Drinking Coffee Good Or Bad For Headaches

Caffeine Free Coffee Alternatives for Migraine Disorders ...

Does drinking coffee help headaches? Does it actually provide a relief? Well, there is a lot of mystery around here. We will clearly explain exact-fact here.

Coffee is a classic beverage brewed from the seeds of berries from coffee species. Coffea is the name of the genus it belongs to and native to Africa. The caffeine content in coffee is known it the bitter and slightly acidic taste. It also can stimulate humans, keeping them energized and active throughout the day. However, this same caffeine content has also been responsible for causing headaches and headache relief for a lot of others.

What Causes Migraines

  • Hormonal changes such as estrogen fluctuations trigger headaches in a lot of women. Many women have a tendency to develop acute Migraines during menopause or pregnancy.
  • Foods such as processed food, salty food and aged cheese can also cause Migraine.
  • Alcohol consumptions is a major cause of extreme Migraines in people.
  • Stress at home or work can also cause Migraines.

What Should You Avoid

While a 2016 study found that migraine intensity in study subjects decreased after discontinuing the use of caffeine, thereâs no reason to avoid it completely if it does not trigger your own headaches, Dr. Crystal says. In fact, consuming coffee has benefits, too.

âCoffee may help prevent neurological diseases, and a compound found in both caffeinated and decaf coffee may help prevent abnormal protein accumulation found in Alzheimerâs and Parkinsonâs patients,â Dr. Crystal says.

Those who are unsure of how caffeine affects their migraines can keep a food journal or use a migraine tracker app to log potential triggers, as well as monitor how much caffeine is a safe amount for you.

In general, Dr. Crystal suggests limiting your caffeine intake to less than 200mg total per day. Thatâs about two cups of coffee, five cups of soda, or one energy drink.

A Juicy Slice Of Watermelon Can Head Off Dehydration Which Is Often A Factor In Headaches And Migraine Attacks

If youre living with migraine, you probably know that certain foods and drinks can trigger an attack. But even though its important to know what to avoid, focusing on the foods to add to your diet matters, too: It may help reduce the number or severity of migraine attacks or other types of headaches.

Food really is the first medicine, says Wynne Brown, MD, the medical director of integrative medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Health in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. When youre trying to manage migraine, what you eat and when you eat can make all the difference, she says.

Being open to change in your diet is a good start, says Dr. Brown. Often, we can get in a rut and eat the same things over and over. By adding different fresh fruits and vegetables to our diet, we can reap benefits in terms of water content as well as vitamins and minerals, she says.

A diet with a variety of good foods will make a big difference both in migraine management and overall health and may improve imbalances that contribute to headaches, says Brown.

If youre looking for ways to change your diet to better manage your migraine, here are some expert tips on the foods and drinks to help you on your journey.

RELATED ARTICLES

Popular Articles